The First Major VAC Ban Wave Of 2017

Only days into 2017 the Valve Anti-Cheat (VAC) system has already caught thousands of cheaters, taking over $24,000 worth of inventory items into the abyss with them in the latest ban-wave to hit the CS:GO community.

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The initial ban-wave started in the late hours of yesterday as a total of 1,379 players were VAC banned, 310 were game banned and a total of $24,414 USD worth of in-game items were lost. The major upset for this wave was the specific cheat-providers that have their cheats detected.

Before we dive into the comments and results of the wave we just need to point out that a VAC wave is not really a specific thing, it is an event that got its name as thousands of players get banned on a specific day and is often a result of Valve releasing an update to their anti-cheat system.

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So it’s time to get into the fun bit of things as we take a look into the cheating forums to see what cheating players and the providers talk about.

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Some of the sites have even closed down their cheats and registration due to a “VAC Issue” which is easily interpreted as being detected.

Another shocker to the gamers is that some providers admitted that their cheaper hacks were the only ones caught and that more expensive and longer-period cheats are still undetected.

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So, as much as we despise cheaters, it is pretty humorous to see just how some of the players justify their new shiny “0 Days Since VAC Ban” message on their profile.

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In similar news, the South Korean government has passed an amendment into law with the specific intent of shutting down video game hacks and modifications. According to PvPLive distributing, promoting or manufacturing cheat programs is “not allowed by the game company and its Terms of Service is now directly illegal.” and people who are caught will face a pretty hefty price including “a maximum of 5 years jail time or $43,000 in fines (50 million KRW).”

This is a great step forward and hopefully, other countries can start developing their own way to combat cheat providers and overall shut down the private cheating sector.

Thanks to UnofficialName for the laugh.

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